Treating alienation in children: it is therapy but not as most people know it.

Karen Woodall

This week I have been working with children who are alienated as well as those who are experiencing transitional difficulties.  The difference is startling, giving us the opportunity to understand at a much deeper level, the ways in which living in separated family situations, creates pressures upon children which cause them to behave in very particular ways.

The very obvious difference between a child who is experiencing transitional difficulty and a child who is alienated is that the former is still able to spend time with both parents, whilst the latter cannot or will not or a combination of both.  Whilst a child who is transitioning between parents will display very obvious signs, the child who is alienated will display the eight signs observed originally by Gardener, which in my experience are stark and very clear when they are present.  Being able to differentiate between a child who is transitioning…

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